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Friday, May 1, 2020 | History

3 edition of Interventions to prevent HIV risk behaviors found in the catalog.

Interventions to prevent HIV risk behaviors

Peggie S. Tillman

Interventions to prevent HIV risk behaviors

January 1991 through November 1996 : 424 citations

by Peggie S. Tillman

  • 283 Want to read
  • 12 Currently reading

Published by U.S. Dept. of Health and Human Services, Public Health Service, National Institutes of Health, National Library of Medicine, Reference Section, Sold by the Supt. of Docs., U.S. G.P.O. in Bethesda, Md. (8600 Rockville Pike), Pittsburgh, PA .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • HIV infections -- Prevention -- Bibliography,
  • HIV infections -- Epidemiology -- Bibliography,
  • Preventive health services -- Bibliography

  • Edition Notes

    Prepared in support of a National Institutes of Health Consensus Development Conference on Interventions to Prevent HIV Risk Behaviors, held in Bethesda, Maryland on February 11-13, 1997.

    Statementprepared by Peggie S. Tillman, Willo Pequegnat.
    GenreBibliography.
    SeriesCurrent bibliographies in medicine -- 96-7.
    ContributionsPequegnat, Willo., National Library of Medicine (U.S.). Reference Section., National Institutes of Health Consensus Development Conference on Interventions to Prevent HIV Risk Behaviors (1997 : Bethesda, Md.)
    The Physical Object
    Paginationix, 21 p.
    Number of Pages21
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL17138522M
    OCLC/WorldCa36138862


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Interventions to prevent HIV risk behaviors by Peggie S. Tillman Download PDF EPUB FB2

Interventions To Prevent HIV Risk Behaviors. National Institutes of Health Consensus Development Conference Statement FebruaryDue to the cumulative nature of medical research, some of the information in this statement is likely to be out of date.

HIV interventions that fundamentally alter the social context within which risk-taking behaviors occur are necessary for long-term, sustainable HIV prevention.

There is certainly a need for structural interventions that address the needs of historically marginalized populations, which are often at great risk for HIV infection.

Genre/Form: Computer network resources: Additional Physical Format: Online version: Interventions to prevent HIV risk behaviors.

[Bethesda, Md.?]: National Institutes of Health, Continuing Medical Education, Office of the Director, []. National Institutes of Health Consensus Development Conference on Interventions to Prevent HIV Risk Behaviors ( Bethesda, Md.). NIH Consensus Development Conference on Interventions to prevent Interventions to prevent HIV risk behaviors book risk behaviors.

Bethesda, Md.: National Institutes of Health, (OCoLC) Material Type. Interventions to prevent HIV risk behaviors. [No authors listed] OBJECTIVE: To provide health care providers, patients, and the general public with a responsible assessment of behavioral intervention methods that may reduce the risk of HIV infection.

This book provides a comprehensive overview of behavioral interventions to prevent HIV-AIDS risk-related behaviors. It synthesizes the empirical literature on individual, group, and community-level interventions and provides an objective and detailed assessment of intervention outcomes.

Factors associated with behavioral risk for HIV transmission, theories. Guided by the National HIV/AIDS Strategy for the United States, CDC and its partners are pursuing a high-impact prevention approach to reducing new HIV infections by using combinations of scientifically proven, cost-effective, and scalable interventions directed to the most vulnerable populations in the geographic areas where HIV prevalence is highest.

Do prevention interventions reduce HIV risk behaviours among people living with HIV. A meta-analytic review of controlled trials. Crepaz N, Lyles CM, Wolitski RJ, Passin WF, Rama SM, Herbst JH, Purcell DW, Malow RM, Stall R; Cited by: This book on structural interventions for HIV prevention emphasizes the value of addressing the underlying environmental determinants of, facilitators of, and contributors toward unsafe behavior.

interventions to help teens and young adults prevent and manage behavioral health challenges in middle and high Interventions to prevent HIV risk behaviors book, college, community, and workplace settings. We examined previously synthesized research concerning the effectiveness of interventions targeting three areas: depression/anxiety, substance use, and suicide Size: 1MB.

After approximately Interventions to prevent HIV risk behaviors book decades of research on interventions to prevent HIV infection, there is a wealth of data documenting the results of HIV prevention majority of existing prevention strategies are behavioral interventions that try to change sexual and substance use practices that increase risk of exposure to and infection with the virus.

This book provides Interventions to prevent HIV risk behaviors book comprehensive overview of behavioral interventions to prevent Interventions to prevent HIV risk behaviors book risk-related behaviors.

Interventions to prevent HIV risk behaviors book synthesizes the empirical literature on individual, group, and community-level interventions and provides an objective and detailed assessment of intervention by: Risking Your Health: Causes, Consequences, and Interventions to Prevent Risky Behaviors explore how those choices are formed and what are their consequences.

Why do people engage in risky behaviors. Many different explanations have been proposed by psychology, sociology, economics or public health. S.C. Kalichman, in International Encyclopedia of the Social & Behavioral Sciences, 4 Levels of Sexual Risk Reduction Interventions. HIV risk reduction intervention elements that include risk education, risk sensitization, and behavioral and communication skills building are found in all effective HIV risk reduction interventions delivered to individuals, groups, and communities.

Behavioral interventions can prevent the transmission of HIV and sexually transmitted infections. This systematic review and meta-analysis assesses the effectiveness and quality of available. The risk is also lower if the HIV-positive partner is taking medicine to treat HIV (called antiretroviral therapy or ART), or if the HIV-negative partner is taking medicine to prevent HIV (called pre-exposure prophylaxis or PrEP).

Both PrEP and ART need to be taken as prescribed in order to work. Psychological interventions are urgently needed to prevent HIV infection: New priorities for behavioral research in the second decade of AIDS. American Psychologist, 48, – PubMed CrossRef Google ScholarCited by:   Historically, interventions to prevent HIV have focused on individual level characteristics such as knowledge and individual sexual practices.

There has, however, been an increasing recognition that adolescents with good levels of knowledge about HIV and low reported levels of HIV risk behaviors remain at risk for HIV : Catherine MacPhail, Audrey Pettifor.

This special issue is based on an NIH Consensus Development Conference entitled Interventions to Prevent HIV Risk Behaviors, held on FebruaryCited by: Public health has a legacy of neglect regarding social and behavioral research.

Too often, prompted by technical and scientific progress, we have ignored even marginalized-the vital "human element" in health thinking and prac tice. Thus, for example, while family planning programs focused on providing a choice among safe and effective contraceptive methods (a.

THE LIMITS OF BEHAVIORAL INTERVENTIONS FOR HIV PREVENTION Dan Wohlfeiler, Jonathan M. Ellen F or the past twenty-five years, prevention of HIV has relied heavily on be-havioral interventions aimed at reducing individual risk behaviors, including unprotected sex and sharing contaminated needles, which have been found to lead to infection.

Interventions to modify sexual risk behaviors for preventing HIV infection in men who have sex with men. The Cochrane Database of Systematic ReviewsIssue 4, Art. No.: CD DOI: /CD Accessed 28 July HIV/AIDS program staff in implementing CDC-developed evidence-based HIV prevention interventions (DEBIs), NASTAD twinned each region with a U.S.

state. Together, the teams assessed specific needs and identified opportunities, selected the most appropriate DEBI, and then worked to adapt and modify the content to the local context. HIV prevention refers to practices that aim to prevent the spread of the Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV).

HIV prevention practices may be undertaken by individuals to protect their own health and the health of those in their community, or may be instituted by governments and community-based organizations as public health policies.

systematic examination of person-to-person HIV behavioral interventions that seek to reduce HIV risk in adult MSM. The relationships among interventions, mediators of behavior change, sex risk behavioral outcomes, incident HIV or STD biological outcomes, and long-term health and quality-of-life outcomes are depicted in the analytic framework.

• Rapid oral HIV testing in urban emergency rooms yields lower positive predictive values than anticipated Consensus Conference. Interventions To Prevent HIV Risk Behaviors. N I H Consensus Development Conference. February[Two silohetted faces looking at each other.

Male and Female symbols. Syringe.] HIV Becomes Chronic Disease. In sub-Saharan Africa, notwithstanding all efforts to prevent HIV infection among youth, an estimated % of women aged 15–24 years [95% confidence interval (CI) = –] and % of young men (95% CI = –) are infected with HIV.

With few prevention technologies available, reducing sexual risk behaviours offers the best hope for. Introduction: HIV-prevention behavior is affected by the environment as well as by characteristics of individuals at risk.

HIV-related structural factors are defined as barriers to, or facilitators of, an individual's HIV prevention behaviors; they may relate to economic, social, policy, organizational or other aspects of the environment. Impact of structural interventions. Counseling interventions are a proven and powerful way to help individuals with HIV cope with the enormous changes in their lives wrought by the disease.

Proposing an innovative conceptual model for HIV clinical work, this book integrates empirical research on the psychosocial aspects of HIV with extensive case by: Group-based comprehensive risk reduction (CRR) interventions delivered to adolescents are recommended to promote behaviors that prevent or reduce the risk of pregnancy, human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), and other sexually transmitted infections (STIs).

The title, "Brief Interventions to Prevent the Spread of HIV," and number of the program announcement must be typed in Section 2a on the face page of the application.

Applications for the FIRST award (R29) must include at least three sealed letters of reference attached to the face page of the original application.

Risky Sexual Behavior. Teens in this sample reported high rates of engaging in risky sexual behavior, placing them at great risk for HIV and other STDs (see Table I for frequencies of risky sexual behaviors stratified by age). Specifically, 78% ( of ) of teens reported that they had engaged in vaginal intercourse at least by:   African-American women are disproportionately affected by HIV, accounting for 60% of all cases among women in the United States.

Although their race is not a precursor for HIV, the socioeconomic and cultural disparities associated with being African American may increase their risk of infection. Prior research has shown that interventions designed to reduce Cited by: Risking Your Health: Causes, Consequences, and Interventions to Prevent Risky Behaviors explore how those choices are formed and what are their consequences.

Why do people engage in risky behaviors. Many different explanations have been proposed by psychology, sociology, economics or public : $ The comparative analysis of the benefit represented by the NNTs of different studies evaluating the behavioral and biomedical interventions aimed at reducing the risk of STD/ HIV transmission allows the identification of lower NNTs accompanied by closer confidence intervals for counseling 8 and treatment strategies to prevent HIV transmission Cited by: 2.

Risking Your Health: Causes, Consequences, and Interventions to Prevent Risky Behaviors Published: December Pages: i - xviii /_fm View Figures.

The HIV/AIDS epidemic remains of global significance and there is a need to target (a) the adolescent age-groups in which most new infections occur; and (b) sub-Saharan Africa where the greatest burden of the epidemic lies. A focused systematic review of school-based sexual health interventions in sub-Saharan Africa to prevent HIV/AIDS and Sexually Cited by: Objectives School-based sex education is a cornerstone of HIV prevention for adolescents who continue to bear a disproportionally high HIV burden globally.

We systematically reviewed and meta-analyzed the existing evidence for school-based sex education interventions in low- and middle-income countries to determine the efficacy of these interventions in changing HIV Cited by:   Fred Ssewamala, professor at the Brown School at Washington University in St.

Louis, has received a $ million National Institutes of Health (NIH) grant to study the effectiveness of interventions in Uganda aimed at protecting adolescent girls against known HIV risk factors. “The highest number of people living with HIV/AIDS ( million) is in sub. Youth who engage in specific behaviors are at higher risk for getting HIV.

The following are ways that youth are currently engaging in high-risk behaviors in the United States, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) Youth Risk Behavior Survey (YRBS) and School Health Policies and Practices Study (SHPPS): Low rates of condom use.

An understanding of the pdf factors for HIV infection lies at the foundation of successful preventive strategies, which should combine both behavioral and biomedical interventions to reduce HIV infection risk. This topic reviews these risk factors and prevention strategies. The peak time for seeking information on topics related to HIV, such as prevention and testing, is at the beginning of the week, while risky.

While most HIV prevention programs target HIV-negative individuals, targeting sexual risk behaviors ebook HIV-positive ebook can prevent the transmission of HIV and other STIs to uninfected individuals. For people living with HIV, these interventions can also prevent co-infections with other STIs and the acquisition of other strains of by: 4.